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Posted by on in Email Monetization

 

About This Infographic

Do different email monetization tactics affect list attrition and engagement differently?  This is what our publishing partners wanted know so we decided to study their monetization practices in detail and some of the results were contrary to typical publisher thinking.  We wanted to focus our research on a couple of statistics that could easily be measured but reveal what the true risks of various monetization tactics actually are.  Therefore, probability of disengagement and opting out was attributed to subscribers who were exposed to various email monetization tactics. This included over 400,000 randomly selected subscribers across 20 publishing partners employing different and overlapping email monetization tactics.  Based on our findings, there’s no surprise that pre-click email monetization tactics (monetization inside an email) significantly increased the probability of list attrition and disengagement.

Native advertising, ads placed in the main content column of an email, had the least effect on attrition and disengagement while 3rd party list rentals increased the probability of a subscriber opting-out or ignoring future messages by over 700%. More importantly, despite the high returns of list rentals, they created dire deliverability issues to future email sent. Contrary to common publisher misconception, however, all post-click email monetization tactics (interstitials, videos, display ads, etc.) that leveraged a subscriber’s encrypted email address for targeting purposes, had very little to no effect on list attrition or disengagement.  In other words, publishers who don’t leverage subscriber email addresses for post-click targeting and monetization purposes are leaving low risk to no risk money on the table.

 

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You may use the infographic above on your website, however, the license we grant to you requires that you properly and correctly attribute the work to us with a link back to our website by using the following embed code.

 

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div align="center"><a href="http://www.goldlasso.com/images/easyblog_images/63/Newsletter-Monetization-Curve.png" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.goldlasso.com/images/easyblog_images/63/Newsletter-Monetization-Curve.png" alt="infographic" width="430"><br /> Click to Enlarge </a><br />Via <a href="http://www.goldlasso.com/blog/entry/354-infographic-post-click-email-monetization-study"> Gold Lasso, Subscriber Engagement & Monetization Systems </a></div

 

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newsletter-monetization-infographic-thumbnail

 

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Posted by on in Compliance

There has been talk for years about the Canadian Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL) and when and if it will come to fruition. Well, it looks like it finally has.

The Canadian Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL) will take effect on July 1, 2014. This legislation applies to all email sent from or to Canada. Businesses have a three year grace period (July 1, 2017) to verify and confirm consent to send email to Canadian recipients but can still only communicate with recipients with whom they have an existing business relationship. Any opt-in information you have before CASL comes into force will be recognized as compliant with CASL. You can review the full details of the legislation here.

Given the looming deadline, it is essential for senders to assess their readiness and develop a compliance strategy for this new legislation. Here are some provisions that should be thoroughly investigated:

  • Permission – CASL has an explicit permission provision. This means that implied consent is NOT acceptable for gathering permission. There are multiple exceptions to the rule, including existing business relationships. Purchases qualify for this exception and the 24-month clock resets with every purchase.

  • Implied consent – There are multiple ways where a sender can obtain consent outside the required express consent. Personal or family relationships, inquiries, and several others.

  • The law applies to email that is accessed on computers in Canada.

  • Very different from CAN-SPAM, this is not an opt-out, but an opt-in law. Allowing people the opportunity to opt-out does NOT satisfy the requirements. A pre-checked box is an implied consent method that WILL NOT be allowed. Auto opting-in abandoned shopping carts and e-receipts for promotional mail will also be outlawed.

  • Private right of action – One of the most talked about pieces of this legislation which allows individuals to bring suit, will not take effect until July 1, 2017.

  • 3 year transition period – Senders have a 3 year grace period to gain consent of individuals. Implied consent is sufficient during this period, but express consent must be gained to go forward after that period.

  • You should update your privacy policy, make sure you are recording consent for proof, and always have a working unsubscribe mechanism.


Ask your ESP to help you identify all Canadian subscribers so you can come up with a plan to re-permission them if needed.

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Posted by on in Permission Marketing

Citizens of Illinois felt 16% stronger than the rest of the United States that their permission is needed before they can be marketed to on their mobile device.

Source:  Determining Perceptions of Marketing Permission Impact Marketing Success

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Posted by on in Permission Marketing

B2B companies feel 12% less strongly than B2C companies that explicit permission is required for marketing.

Source: Determining Perceptions of Marketing Permission Impact Marketing Success

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Posted by on in Permission Marketing

Consumers with higher incomes ($75K - $99K) are more insistent that marketers gain their permission than consumers with lower incomes ($0-$25K).  

 

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